Candor Week: No Bluntness Here



It's the end of week 3 of Debra Driza's Divergent Faction Challenge. Time to report on how the week went.

Speaking my mind doesn't always come easily or naturally to me. It can sometimes take a bit of prompting and nudging to get me to do it so that people aren't left wondering what I really think. I am getting better about it, but I can't say that I made any great strides this week. Candor definitely wouldn't be a faction I'd choose.  I wouldn't want to be as blunt or tactless as Candor can be, nor would I want to deal with it from others on a daily basis.

I think this week proved I'm not meant to be a Candor. 

When chatting with others turned to gossip, I didn't speak out against it. I didn't want to say it in a way that might put others off, or come off as a goody-goody or something. Instead, I simply smiled and listened to the conversation, being part of the group without joining in the gossip myself. 

Yeah, my Amity was showing. 

A Candor would have had no qualms about joining in and honestly sharing their viewpoint--and would have said it right to the face of whoever was being discussed, too. A Dauntless would have spoken up to say what they thought, or defend the one in question, or challenge the others to say it in front of that person.  Or something like that.

At least I looked the part of Candor and wore black and white most of this week! Who knew I had so many clothes with white, black, or both to create Candor style for a whole week? I noticed it seemed to be a popular color combination this week...or maybe that was just because I was paying attention. So, how did your week go? I can't wait to see how everyone else's Candor Week went.


Comments

  1. Candor was tough-- I think jumping in and telling the whole truth all the time can be perceived as rude. Which is sad! I'm southern so I'm biased.

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  2. I do worry about that, the perceived rudeness factor, which is I think my main struggle with Candor. It's possible to both be honest and tactful, and be all the more respected for it. At least, I'm sure it is in theory. The practice of that...not as easy to achieve.

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